Coughlin v. Griffin: Prison Inmates Cannot be Forced to Participate in Alcoholics Anonymous

Coughlin v. Griffin: Prison Inmates Cannot be Forced to Participate in Alcoholics Anonymous

Coughlin v. Griffin

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Coughlin v. Griffin - The U.S. Supreme Court turns down, without comment, an appeal of a decision by the New York Court of Appeals that required participation Alcoholics Anonymous violates prison inmates' religious liberty.

David Griffin, an inmate at New York's Shawangunk state prison describes himself as an atheist or agnostic and sued because participation in A.A. was required by the prison administration.

Two lower state courts disagreed with his arguments, but he New York Court of Appeals agreed that "adherence to the A. A. fellowship entails engagement in religious activity and religious proselytization."

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