First International Anti-Semitic Congress Meets in Dresden Hot

First International Anti-Semitic Congress Meets in Dresden

Adolf Stoecker

Timeline of History

History Topics
Religious History
Jewish History
Political History
Countries

The first international Anti-Semitic Congress ("Congress for Safeguarding of Non-Jewish Interests") meets in Dresden. German anti-Semitism of the late 19th century is currently at its peak, and this congress gives the anti-Semites a chance to bring together all their ideas.

Adolf Stoecker, court preacher for Otto von Bismark and founder of the Christian Socialist Workers' Party, presides.

La Civilta Cattolica, an official Jesuit publication founded by Pope Pius IX and published under the direct control of the papacy, provides very positive coverage:

"It is undeniable that anti-Semitic agitation is making great progress among us. Meetings at which the protesters are expressing their denunciations are being held in rapid succession, and are attracting an immense crowd.

Beyond that, with the aid of the Jews' adversaries, it may be possible for the conservatives to win a good number of electoral districts from the liberals and the progressives."

A "Manifesto to the Governments and Peoples of the Christian Nations Threatened by Judaism" is published and says, in part:

"The meeting recognizes the increase of the Jewish national element and the Jewish influence on our entire national and state affairs as a serious and imminent danger to the moral and economic survival of the German people.

In order to break this influence and to eliminate the evils and danger inevitably resulting from it, it deems the following measures absolutely imperative:

I. The immigration of the Jews, particularly from the East, has to be prevented.

II. The predominant, largely capitalist and laissez-faire economics legislation has to be reformed. It excessively favors usury and the speculation taking place above all in the form of the share trading, banking, and stock markets over honest and upright forms of work.

This should be done in such a way that those productive classes supporting the nation and the state are elevated and strengthened, whereas speculation, on the other hand, is reduced to a harmless level.

III. As long as the Jews persist in their isolation and form a nation within the nation, as it were, they ought to be regarded merely as foreigners who are accorded the right to hospitality.

Consequently, their civil rights should be restricted in such a way that they can neither participate in legislation nor attain any authoritative offices, namely the office of judge."
Powered by JReviews

Today's Major Events

Birth of William Ashley Sunday, American Baseball Player Who Becomes an Evangelist
Walz v. N.Y.C. Tax Commision: Supreme Court Upholds Tax Exemptions for Churches

September History Calendar