School Board Gives Unanimous Vote to Teach 'Both Sides' of Evolution Hot

School Board Gives Unanimous Vote to Teach 'Both Sides' of Evolution

Eugenie Scott

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The school board of Melvindale-Northern Allen Park, a suburb of Detroit, Michigan, votes unanimously to including in science classes information about the "strengths and weaknesses of evolution."

This sort of measure is becoming popular with creationists across America as a way to sneak creationism into public school science classes.

School board president John Rowe doesn't hide the fact that he is a creationist and that his purpose is to deny that evolution is a scientific fact.

According to Rowe:

"The resolution will have our science instructors and science curriculum say that when we teach scientific theories, we teach both sides. Not just those facts that support the theory, but those that dispute the theory. ...

We're just having them try to emphasize that scientific theory is not necessarily a fact. There are people that agree with theories and there are people that don't agree with theories, and we should identify those facts. That's true science — showing both sides of an issue. ...

I would feel that anytime you deliberately leave out a scientific fact because it doesn't fit your theory, you have censorship, and I don't think we should be getting into that either. ...

I feel there's a lot of credence to the fact that evolution is not true, and there's a lot of scientific fact that point to it not being a valid theory anymore."

John Rowe doesn't say, though, whether schools will teach "both sides" when it comes to Atomic Theory, Plate Tectonics, or the Germ Theory of Disease.

Eugenie Scott, head of the national Center for Science Education in California, explains:

"One of the manifestations of creationism is the idea that 'Well, OK, we can't teach evolution and creation science, so we'll teach evolution and against evolution.' Evidence against evolution is just a euphemism for creation science.

It's an approach the creationists have been using the last two, three years — probably longer. The way you can test this is to ask them exactly what they want to teach, and the so-called arguments they'll present are exactly the same as what they used to call creation science."

Video

Creationism vs. evolution: the meaning to our schools and society

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